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Global Health Program

[ graduate program | courses ]

Social Science Building, Second Floor
http://globalhealthprogram.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice.

Global health is at once an increasingly popular new field of study, an urgent social concern, and a powerful interdisciplinary intellectual synthesis aimed at understanding and productively intervening in processes of health, illness, and healing across the globe. Two senses of the term global structure the program’s curriculum: The first defines a geographical space that is planetary and international; the second is an intellectual scope that is holistic and interdisciplinary. Undergraduate degrees in the Global Health Program (BA and minor) are designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of factors related to illness, health, and healing from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective that transcends national borders and regional interests and takes cultural difference and cross-cultural diversity fully into account. Global health is directly concerned with achieving equity in health for people worldwide. It is a synthesis of population-based prevention, individual-level clinical care, health policy and program development, and cross-cultural understanding of variations and commonalities in the experiences with and causes of illness, the process of becoming and staying well, and the practices of healing.

The Global Health Program covers a wide range of topics, including health care, health education, environmental effects on health, infectious disease, mental health, health inequalities, medical sequelae of natural disaster or political violence, indigenous healing practices, nutrition, and reproductive health. The program’s degrees are designed to be intellectually comprehensive, integrating the social sciences, biological sciences, and humanities. In addition, they combine academic and experiential learning, as well as strike a pedagogical balance between the acquisition of hard skills, theory, and real-world knowledge. An important feature of the program is a Global Health Field Experience at a research, service, or clinical site either in the United States or abroad. This program of study helps to prepare students for a career in research and teaching, immigrant service-providing organizations, government agencies, health sciences, or law. The unique research and writing opportunities offered by this minor also make it an excellent preparation for medical and graduate school.

Horizons Honors Thesis Program

During spring quarter of a student’s junior year, global health majors may apply to be a part of the two-quarter honors thesis seminar, open only to global health majors in the BA and BS. The seminar will reflect the unique resources of UC San Diego’s college system by treating the relation between global health and each of the themes highlighted by the colleges: international relations, environmentalism, law/ethics, technology, humanities, and public service. The seminar will also provide an opportunity to expand, deepen, and share the insights of their Global Health Field Experience with members of their cohort.

The first quarter will consist of intensive reading and discussion in fields related to each student’s primary interest and building on their field experience. The second quarter will be a workshop with critical input from all participants focused on preparing a senior thesis that will provide an important credential for students in the next stage of their careers and as they prepare applications for graduate academic or professional training. The Horizons of Global Health capstone conference, held annually in the spring quarter, will assemble all global health majors and minors and be open to the campus community. The conference features a guest speaker with a distinguished reputation in global health along with presentations of theses by graduating participants.

Eligibility:

  • Students must be a global health major (BA or BS) completing their junior year and graduating the next academic year.
  • Students must have a 3.5 overall GPA.
  • Students must have completed GLBH 148 and GLBH 181 with a B or better by spring quarter of their junior year.
  • Students must complete their Global Health Field Experience requirement prior to enrollment in the senior capstone and should be in progress at the time that they submit their application.
  • Accepted students will enroll in the following courses:
    • GLBH 150A. Global Health Honors Capstone Seminar I: Medical Social Science Elective
    • GLBH 150B. Global Health Honors Capstone Seminar II: Medical Humanities Elective

Students completing the honors thesis program can apply the coursework toward one medical social science elective and one medical humanities elective.

The Bachelor of Arts in Global Health
(seventeen courses/sixty-eight units)

All courses applied to the major must receive a letter grade of C– or better. The major will require nine core courses, the primary function of which is to ground all students in the hard skills, analytic tools, and fluency in the debates expected of someone with an expertise in global health.

I. Lower-Division Core Requirements (three courses/twelve units)

All students will take the following:

One of the following introduction courses:

  • HILD 30. History of Public Health
  • GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health

One of the following courses:

  • SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society
  • SOCI 40. Sociology of Health-Care Issues
  • SOCI 70. General Sociology for Premed Students
  • PHIL 26. Science, Society, and Values
  • GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health (if not used for introduction course)

One statistics course:

  • PSYC 60. Introduction to Statistics
  • POLI 30 or 30D. Political Inquiry
  • MATH 11/11L. Calculus-Based Introductory Probability and Statistics
  • COGS 14B. Introduction to Statistical Analysis (COGS 14A)

II. Upper-Division Core Requirements (four courses/sixteen units)

All students will take the following:

  • GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (cross-listed with ANSC 148)
  • GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health
  • MGT 173. Project Management: Health Services

One course in policy analysis (prerequisites listed in parentheses):

  • GLBH 160. Global Health Policy
  • POLI 160AA. Introduction to Policy Analysis (POLI 10 or POLI 11)
  • POLI 170A. Introductory Statistics for Political Science and Public Policy
  • USP 147. Case Studies in Health-Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Populations
  • HISC 180. Science and Public Policy
  • ECON 130. Public Policy (ECON 2 or ECON 100A)
  • ENVR 110. Environmental Law
  • USP 133/SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy
  • USP 171. Sustainable Development

III. Field Experience Requirement

(details below)

IV. Electives (ten courses/forty units)

Eight of the ten electives must be upper division. The elective requirement is designed to reinforce the interdisciplinary character of the field of global health. Students must have course work across the major disciplines.

  • Three biological science courses (one must be upper division)
  • Three medical social science courses
  • One medical humanities course
  • One global processes course
  • One upper division significant writing course from any major elective category
  • One additional upper division elective from one of the following categories: biological science, medical social science, or medical humanities

The Bachelor of Science in Global Health
(twenty-four courses/ninety-six units)

I. Lower-Division Core Requirements (twelve courses/forty-eight units)

Complete two of the following courses:

  • GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health
  • HILD 30. History of Public Health
  • PHIL 26. Science, Society, and Values
  • PSYC 1. Psychology
  • SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society
  • SOCI 40. Sociology of Health-Care Issues
  • SOCI 70. General Sociology for Premed Students

Complete one year of biology: BILD 1, BILD 2, BILD 3

Complete one year of chemistry and lab: CHEM 6A-B-C and 7L

Complete one year of mathematics and statistics: MATH 10A-B and MATH 11 or PSYC 60 or MATH 20A-B and MATH 11 or PSYC 60

II. Upper-Division Core Requirements (four courses/sixteen units)

All students will take the following:

  • GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity
  • GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health
  • MGT 173. Project Management: Health Services
  • One course in policy analysis from the following list:
    • GLBH 160. Global Health Policy
    • POLI 160AA. Introduction to Policy Analysis (POLI 10 or POLI 11)
    • POLI 170A. Introductory Statistics for Political Science and Public Policy
    • USP 147. Case Studies in Health-Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Populations
    • HISC 180. Science and Public Policy
    • ECON 130. Public Policy (ECON 2 or ECON 100A)
    • ENVR 110. Environmental Law
    • USP 133/SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy
    • USP 171. Sustainable Development

III. Field Experience Requirement

(details below)

IV. Electives (eight courses/thirty-two units)

There are eight electives required, all of which must be upper division. The elective requirement is designed to reinforce the interdisciplinary character of the field of global health.

  • Three biological science courses
  • Four medical social science courses
  • One medical humanities course

Global Health Field Experience Requirement:

The Global Health Field Experience project will be carried out at a research, service, or clinical site either in the United States or abroad. Field Experience will be approved by the advisory committee, along with the Study Abroad UC San Diego office (for international placements) and Academic Internship Program (for domestic placements). The project will focus on issues relevant to global health, including health care, health education, environmental effects on health, infectious disease, mental health, health disparities, medical sequelae of natural disaster or political violence, indigenous healing practices, nutrition, and reproductive health. In accord with the campus’s Education Initiative, the Global Health Field Experience will enhance knowledge, skills, and sensitivities, thus engaging “mind, hands, and heart” to create a learning outcome that is scientific, pragmatic, and humanistic.

Field Experience Requirements
  • Minimum one hundred hours distributed over no more than three programs
  • May be completed domestically or abroad (upon approval)
  • May be noncredit or credit bearing (see below)
The Field Experience must meet the following criteria:
  • Require meaningful, challenging work from students while serving the agency’s clients/goals.
  • Provide the student with direct contact with clients or those who directly serve clients.
  • Provide the student with an opportunity to become knowledgeable about aspects of global health and see global health issues in practice.
  • Include on-site orientation, training, and supervision by a designated person in the agency.
  • Students must demonstrate adequate health insurance and participate in a predeparture orientation for abroad programs.

Credit-bearing field experience: Upon approval by petition, a student may enroll in a maximum of two Independent Study (GLBH 199) or Directed Group Study (GLBH 198) courses under mentorship of an affiliated faculty member. This will provide academic credit for the noncredit-bearing Field Experience, through required readings, reflective journals, papers, etc., as determined by agreement between the student and faculty member. The academic result will be to place their Field Experience in the context of the interdisciplinary scholarly literature on global health. When credit is granted either through the program itself or through our GLBH Independent Study/Directed Group Study, this credit will count as an elective toward the major.

Elective Courses

Biological Sciences:

One biological science elective must be upper division

Lower Division (for BA only):

  • ANTH 2. Human Origins
  • ANTH 43. Introduction to Biology and Culture of Race
  • BILD 3. Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
  • BILD 18. Human Impact on the Environment
  • BILD 22. Human Nutrition
  • BILD 26. Human Physiology
  • BILD 36. AIDS, Science, and Society
  • BILD 38. Dementia, Science, and Society
  • BILD 60. Biology and Diversity: Use and Misuse of Science to Justify Bias, Inequity, Exclusion, and Prejudice
  • COGS 11. Minds and Brains
  • COGS 17. Neurobiology of Cognition
  • ENVR 30. Environmental Issues: Natural Sciences

Upper Division: (prerequisites listed in parentheses)

  • ANBI 116. Human Sexuality in Evolutionary Perspective
  • ANBI 131. Biology and Culture of Race
  • ANBI 134. Human Evolutionary Genetics
  • ANBI 139. Evolution of Human Disease
  • ANBI 140. The Evolution of the Human Brain
  • ANBI 141. The Evolution of Human Diet
  • BIBC 102. Metabolic Biochemistry (CHEM 40A-B)
  • BIBC 103. Biochemical Techniques (BILD 1)
  • BIBC 120. Nutrition (BIBC 102)
  • BICD 100. Genetics (BILD 1)
  • BICD 110. Cell Biology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102)
  • BICD 136. AIDS, Science, and Society (BILD 1, BILD 2 recommended)
  • BICD 140. Immunology (BICD 100, BIMM 100)
  • BIEB 150. Evolution (BILD 3 and BILD 1 or BIEB 143)
  • BIEB 176. Conservation and the Human Predicament (ANTH 2 or BILD 3)
  • BIMM 100. Molecular Biology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102, BICD 100)
  • BIMM 110. Molecular Basis of Human Disease (BICD 100, BIBC 102, BIMM 100)
  • BIMM 114. Virology (BIMM 100)
  • BIMM 120. Microbiology (BILD 1 and BIBC 100 or BIBC 102)
  • BIMM 124. Medical Microbiology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102 recommended)
  • BIPN 100. Human Physiology I (BILD 1 and BILD 2)
  • BIPN 102. Human Physiology II (BIPN 100)
  • BIPN 134. Human Reproduction (BIPN 100)
  • COGS 174. Drugs: Brain, Mind, and Culture
  • FMPH 101. Epidemiology (FMPH 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B)
  • FMPH 102. Biostatistics in Public Health (FMPH 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B)
  • GLBH 102. Global Health Epidemiology (STATS: GLBH 20 or FMPH 40)
  • HDS 110. Brain and Behavioral Development (HDP 1 or PSYC 101)
  • SOCI 107. Epidemiological Methods: Statistical Study of Disease (SOCI 60)
Medical Social Sciences:

Anthropology

  • ANSC 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (cross-listed with GLBH 101)
  • ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality (cross-listed with GLBH 105)
  • ANSC 106. Global Health: Indigenous Medicines in Latin America
  • ANSC 121. Psychological Anthropology
  • ANSC 129. Meaning and Healing (cross-listed with GLBH 129)
  • ANSC 139. Native American Health and Healing (cross-listed with GLBH 139)
  • ANSC 143. Mental Health as a Global Health Priority (cross-listed with GLBH 143)
  • ANSC 144. Immigrant and Refugee Health
  • ANSC 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV/AIDS (cross-listed with GLBH 146)
  • ANSC 147. Global Health and the Environment (cross-listed with GLBH 147)
  • ANSC 149. Health, Conflict, and Inequality
  • ANSC 150. Culture and Mental Health (cross-listed with GLBH 150)
  • ANSC 155. Humanitarian Aid: What Is It Good For?
  • ANSC 156. Mad Films
  • ANSC 164. Introduction to Medical Anthropology
  • ANSC 182. Gun Violence as Social Pathology

Communication

  • COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice

Critical Gender Studies

  • CGS 123. Gender and Reproductive Politics (CGS 2A-B) (if not used for global processes)

Economics

  • ECON 140. Economics of Health-Care Producers (ECON 2 or 100B)
  • ECON 141. Economics of Health-Care Consumers (ECON 100C)

Ethnic Studies

  • ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality

Family Medicine and Public Health

  • FMPH 102. Biostatistics in Public Health (FMPH 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B)
  • FMPH 110. Health Behavior and Chronic Disease (FMPH 40)

Global Health

  • GLBH 100. Special Topics in Global Health
  • GLBH 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (cross-listed with ANSC 101)
  • GLBH 105. Global Health and Inequality (cross-listed with ANSC 105)
  • GLBH 110. Demography and Social Networks in Global Health
  • GLBH 111. Clinic on the Border: Health Frontiers in Tijuana
  • GLBH 113. Women’s Health in Global Perspective
  • GLBH 129. Meaning and Healing (cross-listed with ANSC 129) (if not taken for medical humanities)
  • GLBH 139. Native American Health and Healing (cross-listed with ANSC 139)
  • GLBH 141. Clinical Perspectives in Global Health
  • GLBH 142. “When the field is a ward”: Ethnographies of the Clinic
  • GLBH 143. Mental Health as a Global Health Priority (cross-listed with ANSC 143)
  • GLBH 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV (cross-listed with ANSC 146)
  • GLBH 147. Global Health and the Environment (cross-listed with ANSC 147)
  • GLBH 150. Culture and Mental Health (cross-listed with ANSC 150)
  • GLBH 160. Global Health Policy (if not taken for policy analysis requirement)
  • GLBH 162. Research Translation for Global Health
  • GLBH 163. Global Health Technology
  • GLBH 171R. Global Mental Health
  • GLBH 173. Substance Use and Global Mental Health: Case Studies for Research and Praxis
  • GLBH 197. Global Health Academic Internship Program
  • GLBH 198. Directed Group Study
  • GLBH 199. Independent Study in Global Health Field Experience

Political Science

  • POLI 111D. Social Norms and Harmful Practices

Psychology

  • PSYC 100. Clinical Psychology
  • PSYC 101. Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 116. Laboratory in Clinical Psychology Research
  • PSYC 124. Clinical Assessment and Treatment
  • PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology
  • PSYC 134. Eating Disorders
  • PSYC 143. Control and Analysis of Human Behavior
  • PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine
  • PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood
  • PSYC 172. Psychology of Human Sexuality
  • PSYC 179. Drugs, Addiction, and Mental Disorders
  • PSYC 181. Drugs and Behavior
  • PSYC 188. Impulse and Control Disorders

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  • SIO 116. Global Health and Climate Change (if not taken for a global processes elective)
  • SIO 189. Pollution, the Environment, and Health

Sociology

  • SOCI 113. Sociology of the AIDS Epidemic
  • SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine
  • SOCI 135. Medical Sociology
  • SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach
  • SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society
  • SOCI 138. Genetics and Society
  • SOCI 143. Suicide
  • SOCI 173. Sociology of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Urban Studies and Planning

  • USP 143. The US Healthcare System
  • USP 144. Environmental and Preventive Health Issues
  • USP 145. Aging: The Social and Health Policy Issues
  • USP 147. Case Studies in Health-Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Populations (if not taken for policy analysis requirement)
Medical Humanities:

Anthropology

  • ANSC 129. Meaning and Healing (cross-listed with GLBH 129) (if not taken for medical social science elective)
  • ANSC 188. Cultures of Healing
  • ANCS 190. Yoga Practices: From Banaras to Beverly Hills

Critical Gender Studies

  • CGS 111. Gender and the Body

Global Health

  • GLBH 129. Meaning and Healing (cross-listed with ANSC 129) (if not taken for medical social science elective)

History

  • HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century
  • HISC 109. Invention of Tropical Disease
  • HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine
  • HISC 116. History of Bioethics
  • HISC 117. History of Neuroscience
  • HISC 119. Biology and Society
  • HISC 176. History of Medicine in East and Southeast Asia

Literature

  • LTCS 155. Health and Illness in Global Culture
  • LTCS 165. Politics of Food
  • LTWL 177. Literature and Aging

Philosophy

  • PHIL 150. Philosophy of Cognitive Sciences
  • PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics
  • PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values
  • PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics

Global Processes (required for BA only):

Anthropology

  • ANAR 146. Feeding the World
  • ANBI 132. Conservation and the Human Predicament
  • ANSC 124. Cultural Anthropology
  • ANSC 125. Gender, Sexuality, and Society
  • ANSC 140/HMNR 101. Human Rights II: Contemporary Issues
  • ANSC 142. Anthropology of Latin America
  • ANSC 145A. International Politics and Drugs
  • ANSC 154. Gender and Religion
  • ANSC 160. Nature, Culture, and the Environment
  • ANSC 168. The Human Condition

Communication

  • COMM 112G. IM: Language and Globalization
  • COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice (if not used for medical social science elective)
  • COMM 179. Media and Technology: Global Nature and Global Culture

Critical Gender Studies

  • CGS 114. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (cross-listed with ETHN 183)
  • CGS 123. Gender and Reproductive Politics (CGS 2A-B) (if not taken for medical social science elective)

Ethnic Studies

  • ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality
  • ETHN 183. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (cross-listed with CGS 114)

Latin American Studies

  • LATI 122B. Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Practicum

Political Science

  • POLI 108. Politics of Multiculturalism
  • POLI 113A. East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective
  • POLI 122. Politics of Human Rights
  • POLI 125. Gender, Politics, and Globalization
  • POLI 125B. The Politics of Food in a Global Economy
  • POLI 127. Politics of Developing Countries
  • POLI 136. Religion and Politics
  • POLI 136A. Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict
  • POLI 140D. International Human Rights Law: Migrant Populations
  • POLI 145A. International Politics and Drugs
  • POLI 150A. Politics of Immigration
  • POLI 151. International Organizations

Sociology

  • SOCI 111. Local Lives, Global Problems
  • SOCI 127. Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity
  • SOCI 169. Citizenship, Community, and Culture
  • SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development
  • SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa
  • SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa

Significant Writing Courses (required for BA only):

  • ANSC 106. Global Health: Indigenous Medicines in Latin America
  • ANSC 121. Psychological Anthropology
  • ANSC/GLBH 129. Meaning and Healing
  • ANSC 144. Immigrant and Refugee Health
  • ANSC 149. Conflict, Health and Inequality
  • ANSC 155. Humanitarian Aid: What is it good for?
  • ANSC 156. Mad Films
  • ANSC 164. Introduction to Medical Anthropology
  • ANSC 182. Gun Violence as Social Pathology
  • ANSC 188. Cultures of Healing
  • ANSC 190. Yoga Practices: From Banaras to Beverly Hills
  • ANAR 146. Feeding the World
  • ANBI 132. Conservation and the Human Predicament
  • ANSC 124. Cultural Anthropology
  • ANSC 125. Gender, Sexuality, and Society
  • ANSC 140/HMNR 101. Human Rights II: Contemporary Issues
  • ANSC 142. Anthropology of Latin America
  • ANSC 145A. International Politics and Drugs
  • ANSC 154. Gender and Religion
  • ANSC 160. Nature, Culture, and the Environment
  • ANSC 168. The Human Condition
  • CGS 111. Gender and the Body
  • GLBH/ANSC 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development
  • GLBH/ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality
  • GLBH 110. Demography and Social Networks in Global Health
  • GLBH 111. Clinic on the Border: Health Frontiers in Tijuana
  • GLBH/ANSC 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV/AIDS
  • GLBH/ANSC 147. Global Health and the Environment
  • GLBH/ANSC 150. Culture and Mental Health
  • HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century
  • HISC 109. Invention of Tropical Medicine
  • HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine
  • HISC 116. History of Bioethics
  • HISC 117. History of Neuroscience
  • HISC 119. Biology and Society
  • PHIL 150. Philosophy of Cognitive Science
  • PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics
  • PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values
  • PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics
  • USP 143. The US Health Care System
  • USP 144. Environmental and Preventive Health Issues
  • PSYC 116. Laboratory in Clinical Psychotherapy Research
  • POLI 150A. Politics of Immigration (DEI overlap)
  • POLI 151. International Organizations

The Global Health Minor (seven courses/twenty-eight units)

The Global Health minor covers a wide range of topics relevant to global health including health care, health education, environmental effects on health, infectious disease, mental health, health inequalities, medical sequelae of natural disaster or political violence, indigenous healing practices, nutrition, and reproductive health. This program of study helps to prepare students for a career in research and teaching, immigrant service-providing organizations, government agencies, health sciences, or law. The unique research and writing opportunities offered by this minor also make it an excellent preparation for medical and graduate school.

The minor consists of a total of seven courses (twenty-eight units), at least five of which must be upper-division courses. All courses applied to the minor must receive a letter grade of C– or better.

I. Required Core Courses (three courses/twelve units)

All students will take the following required courses, which will introduce them to the field of global health from the dual perspective of public health and the health sciences on the one hand and the medical social sciences on the other.

Choose one of the following introduction courses:

  • HILD 30. History of Public Health OR
  • GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health

Choose two of the following courses:

  • GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (cross-listed with ANSC 148)
  • GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health
  • MGT 173. Project Management in the Health Services

II. Health-Related Biological Science (choose one)

All students will take at least one biological science course relevant to global health, selected from the approved list of electives for the minor.

Lower Division:

  • ANTH 2. Human Origins
  • ANTH 43. Introduction to Biology and Culture of Race
  • BILD 3. Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
  • BILD 18. Human Impact on the Environment
  • BILD 22. Human Nutrition
  • BILD 26. Human Physiology
  • BILD 36. AIDS, Science, and Society
  • BILD 38. Dementia, Science, and Society
  • BILD 60. Biology and Diversity: Use and Misuse of Science to Justify Bias, Inequity, Exclusion, and Prejudice
  • COGS 11. Minds and Brains
  • COGS 17. Neurobiology of Cognition
  • ENVR 30. Environmental Issues: Natural Sciences

Upper Division: (prerequisites listed in parentheses)

  • ANBI 116. Human Sexuality in an Evolutionary Perspective
  • ANBI 131. Biology and Culture of Race
  • ANBI 134. Human Evolutionary Genetics
  • ANBI 139. Evolution of Human Disease
  • ANBI 140. The Evolution of the Human Brain
  • ANBI 141. The Evolution of Human Diet
  • BIBC 102. Metabolic Biochemistry (CHEM 40A-B)
  • BIBC 103. Biochemical Techniques (BILD 1)
  • BIBC 120. Nutrition (BIBC 102)
  • BICD 100. Genetics (BILD 1)
  • BICD 110. Cell Biology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102)
  • BICD 136. AIDS, Science, and Society (BILD 1, BILD 2 recommended)
  • BICD 140. Immunology (BICD 100, BIMM 100)
  • BIEB 150. Evolution (BILD 3 and BILD 1 or BIEB 143)
  • BIEB 176. Conservation and the Human Predicament (ANTH 2 or BILD 3)
  • BIMM 100. Molecular Biology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102, BICD 100)
  • BIMM 110. Molecular Basis of Human Disease (BICD 100, BIBC 102, BIMM 100)
  • BIMM 114. Virology (BIMM 100)
  • BIMM 120. Microbiology (BILD 1 and BIBC 100 or BIBC 102)
  • BIMM 124. Medical Microbiology (BIBC 100 or BIBC 102 recommended)
  • BIPN 100. Human Physiology I (BILD 1 and BILD 2)
  • BIPN 102. Human Physiology II (BIPN 100)
  • BIPN 134. Human Reproduction (BIPN 100)
  • COGS 174. Drugs: Brain, Mind, and Culture
  • FMPH 101. Epidemiology (FMPH 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B)
  • FMPH 102. Biostatistics in Public Health (FMPH 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B)
  • HDS 110. Brain and Behavioral Development (HDP 1 or PSYC 101)
  • SOCI 107. Epidemiological Methods: Statistical Study of Disease (SOCI 60)

Taking any of these courses to fill this requirement of the minor does not preclude a student from taking another course in this list as an elective for the minor.

III. Elective Course Work (choose three):

Anthropology

  • ANSC 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (cross-listed with GLBH 101)
  • ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality (cross-listed with GLBH 105)
  • ANSC 106. Global Health: Indigenous Medicines in Latin America
  • ANSC 121. Psychological Anthropology
  • ANSC 129. Religion and Healing (cross-listed with GLBH 129)
  • ANSC 139. Native American Health and Healing (cross-listed with GLBH 139)
  • ANSC 143. Mental Health as Global Health Priority (cross-listed with GLBH 143)
  • ANSC 144. Immigrant and Refugee Health
  • ANSC 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV (cross-listed with GLBH 146)
  • ANSC 147. Global Health and the Environment (cross-listed with GLBH 147)
  • ANSC 149. Health, Conflict, and Inequality
  • ANSC 150. Culture and Mental Health (cross-listed with GLBH 150)
  • ANSC 155. Humanitarian Aid: What Is It Good For?
  • ANSC 156. Mad Films
  • ANSC 164. Introduction to Medical Anthropology
  • ANSC 182. Gun Violence as Social Pathology
  • ANSC 188. Cultures of Healing

Critical Gender Studies

  • CGS 111. Gender and the Body
  • CGS 123. Gender and Reproductive Politics (CGS 2A-B)

Communication

  • COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice

Economics

  • ECON 140. Economics of Health Producers (ECON 2 or 100B)
  • ECON 141. Economics of Health Consumers (ECON 100C)

Ethnic Studies

  • ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality
  • ETHN 183. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class (cross-listed with CGS 114)

Family Medicine and Public Health

  • FMPH 110. Health Behavior and Chronic Diseases (FMPH 40)

Global Health

  • GLBH 100. Special Topics in Global Health
  • GLBH 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (cross-listed with ANSC 101)
  • GLBH 105. Global Health and Inequality (cross-listed with ANSC 105)
  • GLBH 110. Demography and Social Networks in Global Health
  • GLBH 111. Clinic on the Border: Health Frontiers in Tijuana
  • GLBH 113. Women’s Health in Global Perspective
  • GLBH 129. Meaning and Healing (cross-listed with ANSC 129)
  • GLBH 139. Native American Health and Healing (cross-listed with ANSC 139)
  • GLBH 142. “When the field is a ward”: Ethnographies of the Clinic
  • GLBH 143. Mental Health as a Global Health Priority (cross-listed with ANSC 143)
  • GLBH 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV (cross-listed with ANSC 146)
  • GLBH 147. Global Health and the Environment (cross-listed with ANSC 147)
  • GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (if not taken for core course)
  • GLBH 150. Culture and Mental Health (cross-listed with ANSC 150)
  • GLBH 160. Global Health Policy
  • GLBH 162. Research Translation for Global Health
  • GLBH 163. Global Health Technology
  • GLBH 171R. Global Mental Health
  • GLBH 173. Substance Use and Global Mental Health: Case Studies for Research and Praxis
  • GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health (if not taken for core course)
  • GLBH 197. Global Health Academic Internship Program
  • GLBH 198. Directed Group Study
  • GLBH 199. Independent Study in Global Health Field Experience

History

  • HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century
  • HISC 109. Invention of Tropical Disease
  • HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine
  • HISC 116. History of Bioethics
  • HISC 117. History of Neuroscience
  • HISC 119. Biology and Society
  • HISC 176. History of Medicine in East and Southeast Asia

Literature

  • LTCS 155. Health and Illness in Global Culture
  • LTCS 165. The Politics of Food
  • LTWL 177. Literature and Aging

Rady School of Management

  • MGT 173. Project Management: Health Services (if not taken for core course)

Philosophy

  • PHIL 150. Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences
  • PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics
  • PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values
  • PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics

Psychology

  • PSYC 100. Clinical Psychology
  • PSYC 101. Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 116. Laboratory in Clinical Psychology Research
  • PSYC 124. Clinical Assessment and Treatment
  • PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology
  • PSYC 134. Eating Disorders
  • PSYC 143. Control and Analysis of Human Behavior
  • PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine
  • PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood
  • PSYC 172. Psychology of Human Sexuality
  • PSYC 179. Drugs, Addiction, and Mental Disorders
  • PSYC 181. Drugs and Behavior
  • PSYC 188. Impulse and Control Disorders

Political Science

  • POLI 111D. Social Norms and Global Development

Revelle Global Seminars

  • REV 160 and 165 GS. Public Health and Epidemiology I and II

Sociology

  • SOCI 113. Sociology of the AIDS Epidemic
  • SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine
  • SOCI 135. Medical Sociology
  • SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach
  • SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society
  • SOCI 138. Genetics and Society
  • SOCI 143. Suicide
  • SOCI 173. Sociology of Health, Illness, and Medicine

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  • SIO 116. Global Health and Climate Change
  • SIO 189. Pollution, Environment, and Health

Urban Studies and Planning

  • USP 143. The US Healthcare System
  • USP 144. Environmental and Preventive Health Issues
  • USP 145. Aging: Social and Health Policy Issues
  • USP 147. Case Studies in Health Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Population

IV. Global Health Minor Field Experience (Optional)

Global Health minors may choose to complete a 100-hour Global Health Field Experience requirement to complement their course work.

The Field Experience project will be carried out at a research, service, or clinical site either in the United States or abroad. Field Experience will be approved by the advisory committee, along with the Study Abroad UC San Diego office (for international placements) and Academic Internship Program (for domestic placements). The project will focus on issues relevant to global health, including health care, health education, environmental effects on health, infectious disease, mental health, health disparities, medical sequelae of natural disaster or political violence, indigenous healing practices, nutrition, and reproductive health. In accord with the campus’s Education Initiative, the Global Health Field Experience component will enhance knowledge, skills, and sensitivities, thus engaging “mind, hands, and heart” to create a learning outcome that is scientific, pragmatic, and humanistic.

Field Experience Requirement

  • Minimum one hundred hours distributed over no more than three programs
  • May be completed domestically or abroad, upon approval
  • May be noncredit or credit-bearing (see below)

The Field Experience must meet the following criteria:

  • Require meaningful, challenging work from students while serving the agency’s clients/goals.
  • Provide the student with direct contact with clients or those who directly serve clients.
  • Provide the student with an opportunity to become knowledgeable about aspects of global health and see global health issues in practice.
  • Include on-site orientation, training, and supervision by a designated person in the agency.
  • Students must demonstrate adequate health insurance and participate in a predeparture orientation for abroad programs.

Credit-bearing field experience: Upon approval by petition, a student may enroll in a maximum of two Independent Study (GLBH 199) or Directed Group Study (GLBH 198) courses under mentorship of an affiliated faculty member. This will provide academic credit for the noncredit-bearing field experience through required readings, reflective journals, papers, etc., as determined by agreement between the student and faculty member. The academic result will be to place their field experience in the context of the interdisciplinary scholarly literature on global health. When credit is granted either through the program itself or through our GLBH Independent Study/Directed Group study, this credit will count as an elective toward the minor.